THE LATEST FROM FOCAL POINT RESEARCH

What Will Happen When Recreational Cannabis Becomes Legal in Canada?

What Will Happen When Recreational Cannabis Becomes Legal in Canada?

Cannabis legalization feels like closing the barn door long after the horse has bolted. Recreational cannabis is being used everywhere, regardless of its legal status, and cannabis-containing consumer products are also ubiquitous. Cannabidiol (CBD) is one of the important active compounds in cannabis and is wildly used in topical products due to its anti-inflammatory properties and other benefits. Even though CBD is technically not allowed in cosmetics under regulations enforced by Health Canada and the U.S. FDA, you can easily purchase countless CBD-containing products online and at specialty retailers. The sale of these products also confuses consumers, as a majority of the products are marketed as derived from hemp and thus claimed to be legal and allowed for consumer use. However, according to Canada’s Cosmetic Ingredient Hotlist, only hemp seed oil is allowed in cosmetic products. But this oil is restricted to not contain any CBD, and contain less than 10 parts per million Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) – the psychoactive component of cannabis. Cosmetic products in Canada cannot contain any therapeutic/drug benefits which is why cannabis-derived CBD is legal by prescription only. This brings to question what will regulators do after legalization? Will they allow or rein in these “under the radar” products [...]

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Certain Disinfectants and Sterilants Will Now Be Classified as Medical Devices

Certain Disinfectants and Sterilants Will Now Be Classified as Medical Devices

High-level disinfectants and sterilant solutions have been largely regulated in Canada as drug products as per Health Canada’s Food and Drug Regulations (FDR). However as of March of this year, disinfectants and sterilants that do not meet the definition of an antimicrobial agent under the FDR are now be regulated as medical devices. This includes products such as contact lens disinfectants. This reclassification of disinfectants and sterilants was accomplished under the Canada-United States Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC) Work Plan for Medical Devices. The RCC was established in 2011 and works to align the regulatory requirements between Canada and the United State as well as increase transparency and coordination between the two countries. At the time of publishing, the disinfectants and sterilants that will be reclassified will be considered Class II medical devices. An antimicrobial agent is defined by Health Canada as a drug that can destroy pathogenic microorganisms and are labelled for use in disinfecting environmental surfaces or medical devices. On the other hand, a high-level disinfectant is labelled as a substance that can destroy or inactivate microbial pathogens but not bacterial endospores. Sterilants are like disinfectants and are capable of destroying or inactivating bacterial and fungal spores as [...]

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Health Canada to Start Using Global Medical Device Nomenclature

Health Canada to Start Using Global Medical Device Nomenclature

Health Canada has announced their intention to transition to Global Medical Device Nomenclature from its current categorization of medical devices. The intent of this change is to improve the availability, access and quality of information for medical devices in Canada. The Global Medical Device Nomenclature (GMDN) consists of a list of names to identify all medical device products and is used to provide health authorities, regulators, health care providers, manufacturers and others with a naming system that can be used to accurately exchange information on medical devices. The GMDN is recommended by the International Medical Device Regulators Forum (IMDRF) and is currently used by more than 70 national regulatory bodies. Medical device manufacturers who possess active medical device licenses will be invited to determine a GMDN code for each device. In addition, as part of every medical device application and licence amendment, applicants will be asked to provide GMDN data as well. The current GMDN database includes over 23,000 active terms covering a wide range of technologies and is constantly growing. As part of the transition to GMDN, medical device manufacturers will be encouraged to obtain GMDN membership. There is a cost to membership which varies on [...]

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How Advanced Technology is Changing the Cosmetic Industry

How Advanced Technology is Changing the Cosmetic Industry

With many beauty products, there are products that work for some consumers but may not for others. This has led to the call for personalization of cosmetic and personal care products that are better suited for the needs and characteristics of the individual consumer. Several cosmetic brands have worked in this direction, marketing different products targeted for various skin types and needs, even some who create individualized products designed for the consumer. However, there is a growing number of companies that are using advanced technology to create products designed specifically for an individual – with the help of artificial intelligence. Cosmetic companies such as Proven are creating personalized skincare products with the use of a large database consisting of consumer reviews of products, current beauty products on the market, cosmetic ingredients and scientific and peer-reviewed journal articles about the skin and cosmetic ingredients. AI is used to search through the information in the database and make connections between product categories, ingredients and reviews. The data collected will be filtered into categories according to skin type, ethnicity and geographic location of the consumer. All the consumer must do is complete a short quiz asking for age, [...]

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Could there be a possible ban on Disposable Wet Wipes?

Could there be a possible ban on Disposable Wet Wipes?

As evident in the recent ban of plastic microbeads in many countries, there are a lot of efforts to reduce the number of single-use plastic products that go to waste. For example, disposable wet wipes. The popular household item can be sold for many uses, including for babies, hygiene, make-up removing, household and pets. These one-time use items are made of cotton woven together with nonbiodegradable plastic resins. Regardless, wipes are thrown away and flushed down the toilet in large quantities. This has become a growing issue in the UK where the government is looking to eliminate wet wipes entirely along with other forms of avoidable plastic in their 25 Year Environment Plan. The improper disposal of wipes has led to an increasing number of sewer blockages and costing taxpayer money to remove. This problem isn’t exclusive in the UK, many blockages have come up consisting of wipes and other substances that costs Canadian and American taxpayers millions. When wipes are passed through sewers, they end up in the marine environment and harming nearby species. Although there is some concern of the removal of wet disposable wipes from the daily [...]

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