THE LATEST FROM FOCAL POINT RESEARCH

U.S. Trade War Tariffs and the Impacts on the Cosmetic Industry

U.S. Trade War Tariffs and the Impacts on the Cosmetic Industry

Over the past few months there have been a lot of news coming from the United States government relating to tariffs against many its trading partners. The many tariffs and retaliations by other nations interferes with a wide range of industries. Earlier this spring, the Trump administration imposed a 25% tariff on steel and aluminum coming into the United States as part of the President’s call for increased national security. Canada is the number 1 supplier of steel and aluminum to the U.S., contributing to one-sixth of the amount of imported steel and more than half of the aluminum consumed in the U.S. This will greatly affect the Canadian economy and as counter-measure, the Canadian government announced the imposition of a 10% surtax on 4 categories of personal care products imported from the U.S.: manicure/pedicure preparations, hair lacquers, shaving preparations, and facial cleansers/body washes. The U.S. personal care industry has lobbied the U.S. administration and Congress to express their concern as to how tariffs will undermine the highly integrated industry in both nations. Stated by the Personal Care Products Council (PCPC), “Cosmetics and personal care products companies rely heavily on open markets. [...]

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Alpha-Hydroxy Acids and Acid Peel Products: Canadian Hotlist Confusion

Alpha-Hydroxy Acids and Acid Peel Products: Canadian Hotlist Confusion

Acid peel products have become increasingly popular in Canada. Acid peel products typically contain the Canadian Hotlist ingredients Alpha-Hydroxy-Acids (AHA’s). These peel products are intended for topical application only, are usually applied to the face, and can either be used at home (consumer use) or by skin-care professionals (professional use). Acid peel products with AHA’s can either be classified as a cosmetic or as a prescription drug – depending on the concentration of the AHA’s and also the pH of the product.   For consumer use – at home peels – the maximum concentration of AHA’s that is allowed within the product is 10% and pH of equal to or greater than 3.5. AHA concentrations below 3% do not require a warning statement to be present on the product’s label, but concentrations above 3% (no matter if for consumer use of professional use) do.   For professional use – peels to be used by skin-care professionals only – the maximum concentration of AHA’s that is allowed within the product is “30% or a pH of 3-3.5”, as per the Hotlist. The controversial aspect of this restriction is the “or” statement, which tends to confuse most companies as this statement could be interpreted to [...]

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Amendments to Health Canada’s Cosmetic Ingredient Hotlist

Amendments to Health Canada’s Cosmetic Ingredient Hotlist

Health Canada has recently updated their Cosmetic Ingredient Hotlist as of June 2018. This updated Hotlist has added pigment red 4, also known as Red 36 or CI 12085, to its list of restricted substances with a maximum concentration of 3% permitted in cosmetic products. This addition was due to potential health concerns identified by the Chemicals Management Plan (CMP). Additional amendments to the Hotlist includes changes to the preservative methylisothiazolinone (MI). MI is a restricted substance in the Hotlist and amendments have been made to add a new condition for the substance as prohibited in leave-on cosmetics products, as well as reduce the maximum concentration allowed in rinse-off products to 0.0015%. This is due to risks of sensitization. For products containing both MI and a mixture of Methylisothiazolinone and Methylchloroisothiazolinone (MI/MCI), the total concentration of MI/MCI and MI combined shall not exceed 0.0015%. This regulation brings Canada in line with Europe. Chloramine T has been amended as well, to add “related compounds”. These related compounds have been known to convert into Chloramine T when mixed into a solution. Lastly, Oleandrin has been removed from the Hotlist and as [...]

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Plastic Particles Are More Prevalent in Your Cosmetics & Personal Care Products Than You Think

Plastic Particles Are More Prevalent in Your Cosmetics & Personal Care Products Than You Think

Plastic microbeads are either banned or becoming banned in over 10 jurisdictions worldwide. However, this doesn’t mean that our cosmetics and personal care products are entirely plastic-free. There are many more plastic particles present that are in your everyday products that you have not considered. According to Belgium’s Federal Public Service of Health, Food Chain Safety and Environment, there are at least 67 different types of plastics in cosmetic products. Many of which are homogenous into the product and therefore not as ubiquitous as exfoliating microbeads. What a lot of people don’t know is that plastic particles are present in synthetic polymers. Synthetic polymers are a popular ingredient in a lot of cosmetic and personal care brands in lipsticks, mascara, deodorants, etc. These polymers (i.e. polyacrylate, polyethylene glycol, polyethylene nylon-12, etc.) are used in personal care formulations as stabilizers or rheology modifiers and contain plastic additives to modify the colour, physical properties and heat resistance of the polymer. The plastics present are rarely filtered out of our wastewater treatment plants and contributes to the growing number of plastics that accumulate in the marine environment and are ingested by small organisms in the ocean. There are a lot of natural [...]

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Health Canada Intends to Propose Post-Market Amendments to Medical Devices

Health Canada Intends to Propose Post-Market Amendments to Medical Devices

Health Canada announced their plans to propose changes to strengthen the post-market surveillance and risk management of medical devices in Canada. This is part of the 5-year initiative on Health Canada’s regulatory review of drugs and devices as well as keeping in line with the Protecting Canadians from Unsafe Drugs Act (Vanessa’s Law). Health Canada has stated their reasons to make changes to the Medical Devices Regulations which includes:

  • increasing the complexity of medical devices,
  • increase the use of real-world data and evidence amongst international regulators,
  • push for greater alignment of regulations with those of other countries; as well as
  • produce an environment that supports the integration of new technologies into the health care system while maintaining patient safety.
The overall objective to strengthen the post-market surveillance of medical devices is to provide additional oversight on medical devices already in the market and to ensure these are safe and effective to use. These changes will allow the Minister of Health the ability to:
  • Request analytical issue reports from a manufacturer when there is a suspicion or concern of safety with a medical device
  • Request the information that was used to create the analytical issue report and any [...]

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